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Computers are useless. They can only give you answers.

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) Spanish painter.

Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) American naturalist, poet and philosopher.

When we can drain the Ocean into mill-ponds, and bottle up the Force of Gravity, to be sold by retail, in gas jars; then may we hope to comprehend the infinitudes of man's soul under formulas of Profit and Loss; and rule over this too, as over a patent engine, by checks, and valves, and balances.

Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) British historian and essayist.

Computer science only indicates the retrospective omnipotence of our technologies. In other words, an infinite capacity to process data (but only data -- i.e. the already given) and in no sense a new vision. With that science, we are entering an era of exhaustivity, which is also an era of exhaustion.

Jean Baudrillard (1929-2007) French sociologist, and philosopher.

Technology has advanced more in the last thirty years than in the previous two thousand. The exponential increase in advancement will only continue. Anthropological Commentary The opposite of a trivial truth is false; the opposite of a great truth is also true.

Niels Bohr (1885-1962) Danish physicist.

The press, the machine, the railway, the telegraph are premises whose thousand-year conclusion no one has yet dared to draw.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) German-Swiss philosopher and writer.

Where there is the necessary technical skill to move mountains, there is no need for the faith that moves mountains.

Eric Hoffer (1902-1983) American philosopher and author.

If you don't know how to do something, you don't know how to do it with a computer.

Unknown Source

Computers in the future will weigh no more than 1.5 tons. [Quoted in Popular Mechanics 1950]

Unknown Source

In health of mind and body, men should see with their own eyes, hear and speak without trumpets, walk on their feet, not on wheels, and work and war with their arms, not with engine-beams, nor rifles warranted to kill twenty men at a shot before you can see them.

John Ruskin (1819-1900) English art critic.

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