Home > Miscellaneous >

Theater

The stage is not merely the meeting place of all the arts, but is also the return of art to life.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Irish poet and dramatist.

The theatre, for all its artifices, depicts life in a sense more truly than history, because the medium has a kindred movement to that of real life, though an artificial setting and form.

George Santayana (1863-1952) American philosopher and poet.

In a drama of the highest order there is little food for censure or hatred; it teaches rather self-knowledge and self-respect.

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) English poet.

The theater, which is in no thing, but makes use of everything -- gestures, sounds, words, screams, light, darkness -- rediscovers itself at precisely the point where the mind requires a language to express its manifestations. To break through language in order to touch life is to create or recreate the theatre.

Antonin Artaud (1896-1948) French playwright, and poet.

We need a type of theatre which not only releases the feelings, insights and impulses possible within the particular historical field of human relations in which the action takes place, but employs and encourages those thoughts and feelings which help transform the field itself.

Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) German writer.

The pit of a theatre is the one place where the tears of virtuous and wicked men alike are mingled.

Denis Diderot (1713-1784) French philosopher.

To treat a ''big'' subject in the intensely summarized fashion demanded by an evening's traffic of the stage when the evening, freely clipped at each end, is reduced to two hours and a half, is a feat of which the difficulty looms large.

Henry James (1843-1916) American author.

The drama's laws, the drama's patrons give, for we that live to please, must please to live.

Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

By whatever means it is accomplished, the prime business of a play is to arouse the passions of its audience so that by the route of passion may be opened up new relationships between a man and men, and between men and Man. Drama is akin to the other inventions of man in that it ought to help us to know more, and not merely to spend our feelings.

Arthur Miller (1915-2005) 1915-, American Dramatist

A playwright is the litmus paper of the arts. He's got to be, because if he isn't working on the same wave length as the audience, no one would know what in hell he was talking about. He is a kind of psychic journalist, even when he's great.

Arthur Miller (1915-2005) 1915-, American Dramatist

Advertisment

Advertisment