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Civilization

A civilization is a heritage of beliefs, customs, and knowledge slowly accumulated in the course of centuries, elements difficult at times to justify by logic, but justifying themselves as paths when they lead somewhere, since they open up for man his inner distance.

Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1900-1944) French aviator and writer.

Civilization is a limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) U.S. humorist, writer, and lecturer.

The word ''civilization'' to my mind is coupled with death. When I use the word, I see civilization as a crippling, thwarting thing, a stultifying thing. For me it was always so. I don't believe in the golden ages, you see... civilization is the arteriosclerosis of culture.

Henry Miller (1891-1980) American author.

The three great elements of modern civilization, Gun powder, Printing, and the Protestant religion.

Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) British historian and essayist.

Civilization is a process in the service of Eros, whose purpose is to combine single human individuals, and after that families, then races, peoples and nations, into one great unity, the unity of mankind. Why this has to happen, we do not know; the work of Eros is precisely this.

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) Austrian fhysician. Founder of Psychoanalysis.

The path of civilization is paved with tin cans.

Elbert Hubbard (1856-1915) American editor, publisher, and author of the mora

One might enumerate the items of high civilization, as it exists in other countries, which are absent from the texture of American life, until it should become a wonder to know what was left.

Henry James (1843-1916) American author.

Every new stroke of civilization has cost the lives of countless brave men, who have fallen defeated by the ''dragon,'' in their efforts to win the apples of the Hesperides, or the fleece of gold. Fallen in their efforts to overcome the old, half sordid savagery of the lower stages of creation, and win the next stage.

D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930) English writer.

Increased means and increased leisure are the two civilizers of man.

Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) British politician and author.

As long as our civilization is essentially one of property, of fences, of exclusiveness, it will be mocked by delusions. Our riches will leave us sick; there will be bitterness in our laughter; and our wine will burn our mouth. Only that good profits, which we can taste with all doors open, and which serves all men.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) U.S. poet, essayist and lecturer.

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