Home > Time >

Age

The years between fifty and seventy are the hardest. You are always being asked to do things, and yet you are not decrepit enough to turn them down.

T. S. Eliot (1888-1965) American-English poet and playwright.

When your friends begin to flatter you on how young you look, it's a sure sign you're getting old.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) U.S. humorist, writer, and lecturer.

Forty is the old age of youth, fifty is the youth of old age.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) French poet, dramatist and novelist.

Old age is far more than white hair, wrinkles, the feeling that it is too late and the game finished, that the stage belongs to the rising generations. The true evil is not the weakening of the body, but the indifference of the soul.

André Maurois (1885-1967) French writer.

He that is not handsome at 20, nor strong at 30, nor rich at 40, nor wise at 50, will never be handsome, strong, rich or wise.

George Herbert (1593-1632) British poet.

Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) U.S. humorist, writer, and lecturer.

Old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) British statesman and philosopher.

The excess of our youth are checks written against our age and they are payable with interest thirty years later.

Charles Caleb Colton (1780-1832) British clergyman, sportsman and author.

For age is opportunity no less than youth itself, though in another dress, and as the evening twilight fades away, the sky is filled with stars, invisible by day.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) U.S. poet.

As life runs on, the road grows strange with faces new -- and near the end. The milestones into headstones change, Neath every one a friend.

James Russell Lowell (1819-1891) American poet, critic and editor.

Advertisment

Advertisment