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Mathematics

As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain, and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.

Albert Einstein (1879-1955) German-Swiss-U.S. scientist.

Mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.

Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) British logician and philosopher.

Mathematics, rightly viewed, posses not only truth, but supreme beauty a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture.

Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) British logician and philosopher.

Mathematicians are like Frenchman: whatever you say to them they translate Into their own language, and forthwith it is something entirely different.

Unknown Source

I know that two and two make four -- and should be glad to prove it too if I could -- though I must say if by any sort of process I could convert 2 and 2 into five it would give me much greater pleasure.

Lord Byron (1788-1824) British poet.

Mathematics would certainly have not come into existence if one had known from the beginning that there was in nature no exactly straight line, no actual circle, no absolute magnitude.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) German-Swiss philosopher and writer.

Yet what are all such gaieties to me whose thoughts are full of indices and surds?

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898) English mathematician and novelist.

Mathematics may be compared to a mill of exquisite workmanship, which grinds your stuff to any degree of fineness; but, nevertheless, what you get out depends on what you put in; and as the grandest mill in the world will not extract wheat flour from peas cods, so pages of formulae will not get a definite result out of loose data.

Thomas H. Huxley (1825-1895) English biologist.

I would advise you Sir, to study algebra, if you are not already an adept in it: your head would be less muddy, and you will leave off tormenting your neighbors about paper and packthread, while we all live together in a world that is bursting with sin and sorrow.

Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

So-called professional mathematicians have, in their reliance on the relative incapacity of the rest of mankind, acquired for themselves a reputation for profundity very similar to the reputation for sanctity possessed by theologians.

Georg C. Lichtenberg (1742-1799) German scientist, satirist and anglophile.

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