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Bachelor

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man is in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) English novelist.

Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried, or childless men.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) British statesman and philosopher.

A bachelor's life is a fine breakfast, a flat lunch, and a miserable dinner.

Jean de la Bruyère (1645-1696) French satiric moralist.

A single man has not nearly the value he would have in a state of union. He is an incomplete animal. He resembles the odd half of a pair of scissors.

Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) American statesman, scientist and philosopher.

It is impossible to believe that the same God who permitted His own son to die a bachelor regards celibacy as an actual sin.

Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) American journalist, satirist and social critic.

Bachelors know more about women than married men; if they didn't, they'd be married too.

Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) American journalist, satirist and social critic.

Bachelors have consciences, married men have wives.

Henry Louis Mencken (1880-1956) American journalist, satirist and social critic.

Let sinful bachelors their woes deplore; full well they merit all they feel, and more: unaw by precepts, human or divine, like birds and beasts, promiscuously they join.

Alexander Pope (1688-1744) English poet and satirist.

Somehow a bachelor never quite gets over the idea that he is a thing of beauty and a boy forever.

Helen Rowland (1875-1950) American journalist and humorist.

Marrying an old bachelor is like buying second-hand furniture.

Helen Rowland (1875-1950) American journalist and humorist.

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